Last Day In The Army

I wanted to take the opportunity to share a few thoughts about my army experience in the I.D.F over the last 13 years and what I have gained.

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It’s 3:00 AM and most of us just want to crawl up into a corner and sleep. A minute later a flash on the screen indicating another attack in the heart of Jerusalem causes everyone to shake off the sleep and swing into action. An attack usually means some type of missile landing in a populated area. This has been the routine over the last four days of the Home Front Command’s main office in Jerusalem. We are currently responsible for 1.5 million citizens in times of emergency. Our main focus is to provide recommendations to the heads of the army and city hall so they can make effective decisions in any type of crisis regarding civilian population.

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My first week in boot camp 2002

Today will be the last time I participate in a city wide exercise designed to test the readiness of the Home Front Command in Jerusalem. It’s been a long four days with no sleep, egg and tuna sandwiches and dealing with army bureaucracy. I wanted to write a few words about my experience in the I.D.F as my military adventure comes to an end.
During my thirteen years I learned a bit of car mechanics, did guard duty in the Shomron, Galilee and Hebron area and finished my time as a logistics specialist in the Home Front Command coordinating evacuations in times of emergency. Although I joined the I.D.F at the age of 26 doing three months of basic training I still did about a month a year of reserve duty. It’s fair to say that I was more of a tourist than a soldier, an observer more than hands on. I feel as well as my superiors that I was able to contribute in ensuring a stronger I.D.F.

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Final words at the end of my army service 2017

But my final comments are more of what I think of the army as a whole and the people I leave behind. Like most armies, the average age is 21 years old but the level of maturity and concern reflects the age of 55. Everyone cares and make great effort to be the best. There are no saints, only people who make mistakes and try to do better the next time around. We all come from different backgrounds yet we become a very effective team to solve very complex problems. Respect for human life, morality and sensitivity were the hallmarks of those around me. Each soldier knew the value of life and understood the fine balance that when necessary we also need to fight and kill. I had the opportunity to see and learn about our fragile security situation especially in the North on the Golan Heights. I had a rare chance to learn about the DARPA laser-guided correction system designed to help scouts become better sharp shooters.

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Training exercise; new immigrants from Canada, Mexico, Russia, France, Belgium, Cuba and Poland

I participated in a form between the I.D.F and AM General, the designers of the famous Humvee. The army also gave me the chance to break away from the routine of family and work and travel a bit around Israel. Most importantly, I used the time to dialogue with soldiers about current events, Judaism and every other issue imaginable. For most of them, it was the first time they talked with someone wearing a kippah. I was able to slightly break down the walks built by the media. One example was the chance to take the regional director of the Shinui Party to a Friday night meal to the home of an ultra-orthodox family that was originally from Chomedy.

I have tremendous admiration for the soldiers who fulfill their compulsory service and the complicated challenges they face. God bless their safe return!