The 4th Sovereignty Conference

This week I attended the 4th Sovereignty Conference at the Crown Plaza in Jerusalem. It’s ironic that the conference addressed the issue of sovereignty in the Land of Israel with a focus on Judea and Samaria. For 69 years since the creation of the State of Israel its own citizens still debate the pros and cons of secure borders. Even after the Regulation Law was passed in the Knesset this week legalizing 4,000 homes in Judea and Samaria, many have turned their eyes to the Supreme Court in hopes that it can be overturned. And until recently, the official policy of our government was denying its own sovereignty. Jerusalem is in question, the return of the Golan Heights will be discussed in final negotiations with the Syrian government, we dismantled Aza and continued to chip away at Judea and Samaria. And make no mistake; Yesh Din, B’tselem, Peace Now and their many associates view their success in Amona and Givat Zev as only the beginning and the Regulation Law as only a minor obstacle.

Then one needs to ask how it is possible that some want sovereignty now while others are either unsure, prefer it at a future date or not at all. Why would anyone want certain citizens to be denied basic rights that the rest enjoy?

To understand this we need to look at the various stages the Jewish people have gone through in the last century. Theodore Herzl said in Basel Switzerland during the first Zionist Conference held in 1897, “At Basel I founded the Jewish State…Perhaps in 5 years, and certainly in 50 everyone will know it”. Herzl and his peers were dreamers. They had a dream and works to see its fruition. Fifty years later out of the ashes of the Holocaust, David Ben-Gurion declared Statehood in May of 1948. Now that the dream was realized, there immediate responsibility was to build. We were responsible to build roads, hospitals, schools, an army, housing, agriculture and more. For the next fifty years we developed the most advance country in history.  But now that the country is built and the dream actualized how are we to characterize the next fifty years? I would like to suggest that the next fifty years will be devoted to creating an identity. What is the spirit of the country and people? The underlining principle is discovering who we really are as a nation. It is the people that define whether a country is great and greatness means moral responsibility towards one another. In many ways this is the greatest challenge of all and the potential reward or missed opportunity will determine the future of Israel as a State. Each one of us at some point will require introspection and a look at the long term picture and how we fit. For the first time we will have to learn to live together like a family including religious, secular, old, young, men and women from all four corners of the world. If we can realize our common destiny then sovereignty will answer itself. In order to achieve these lofty end goals we will have to address more basic issues along the way like educating the public on why sovereignty is important and necessary for all citizens and its short and long term benefits.